vintageanchorbooks:

James Baldwin debates William F. Buckley, 1965

I have wanted women whose very shoes are worth all I have ever possessed.
John Fante, Ask the Dust
I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it.
Edith Sitwell
books0977:

Three Hundred & One Things a Bright Girl Can Do. Jean Stewart. The Musson Book Company, Toronto, 1911.
The book begins with a ringing endorsement of women’s “carriage, health and intellect,” and offers as proof the example of bicycle riding: “How gracefully and well does a woman ride a bicycle usually; how hump-backed and ungainly do most men appear upon the same machine!” Stewart has great faith in the abilities of girls: later on, she writes that “Almost every cultivated girl, at some period of her life, finds herself interested in Gothic architecture.”

books0977:

Three Hundred & One Things a Bright Girl Can Do. Jean Stewart. The Musson Book Company, Toronto, 1911.

The book begins with a ringing endorsement of women’s “carriage, health and intellect,” and offers as proof the example of bicycle riding: “How gracefully and well does a woman ride a bicycle usually; how hump-backed and ungainly do most men appear upon the same machine!” Stewart has great faith in the abilities of girls: later on, she writes that “Almost every cultivated girl, at some period of her life, finds herself interested in Gothic architecture.”

Source: books0977

What schoolmasters say is not always wrong.
“You’re a good chap, Smiggers, but don’t go to seed”
Said Pettitt in bathtime at school long ago.
He seemed so earnest that I nearly cried,
But up until now I’ve laughed at his warning
Of where disregard of his words might lead –
Until last night when I dreamed I had died
And Pettitt was God.

Hank made us lay out our beds like soldiers;
After Cert “A” he summoned me, scowling
“Vile boy, I see that you’ve mucked it again!”
Of course, I didn’t care then: I was proud
And resigned from the Corps against his advice –
But heard Hank’s voice with its military sting
As today I strode through the playground crowd:
“Well, Smith, you’ve failed!”

I pity myself that now I’m a puppet
Like Hank, and Pettitt, and roaring Gubbo;
That I must answer, when asked by my friends
“If you take your pupils aside and say:
‘Vile boys, this won’t do, disobedience is wrong,
And if you don’t know it I’ll make you know!’
Do you really mean that those boys should obey?”:
“I may, in a way.”

They are singing this morning before me
“How wonderful” etc. “must thy sight be”
And if their croaking cannot quite mean God
Nor can it quite mean me. I ask myself: what
Should it mean? Their heads incline; I bow
My own, until a colleague warns: “Hey, old
Boy! Head up, and watch for talking: we’re not
Expected to pray!”

Martin Seymour-Smith, What schoolmasters say