The basic tool for the manipulation of reality is the manipulation of words. If you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use them.
Philip K. Dick
jellobiafrasays:
Language and Silence (1969 ed.)

jellobiafrasays:

Language and Silence (1969 ed.)

bartking:

(via The Christopher Walken School of English - Imgur)

{I believe that’s where e.e. cummings went.}

bartking:

(via The Christopher Walken School of English - Imgur)

{I believe that’s where e.e. cummings went.}

erikkwakkel:

Sealed with a kiss
This discovery about a secret Viking message is special - and will put a big smile on your face. For years researchers have tried to crack a Viking rune alphabet known as Jötunvillur. It is found in some 80 inscriptions, including the one above, which dates from the 11th or 12th century. Recently the news broke that a runologist in Norway was successful. It turns out that you had to replace the rune character with the last letter of the sound it produced. So the rune for “f”, which was pronounced like “fe”, represented an “e”. And so researchers were able to decode the 900-year-old message on the piece of wood above, which turned out to be - wait for it… - “Kiss me”! It gets better, however. It turns out that coding and decoding such messages was a playful game, a leisure activity. This is clear from the fact that some of the inscriptions invite the reader to solve the code, stating for example “Interpret these runes.” This, of course, makes the discovery of the “Kiss me” message even more sensational. The kiss was no doubt the reward for the successful individual who cracked this particular message. Two Viking lovers entertaining themselves with a playful coding game - that came with a delightful climax. Awesome.
More information: this Norwegian article originally reported the story, which is also the source of the image (made by Jonas Nordby, the researcher who cracked the code). I picked up the story from the invaluable Medievalists blog (here).

erikkwakkel:

Sealed with a kiss

This discovery about a secret Viking message is special - and will put a big smile on your face. For years researchers have tried to crack a Viking rune alphabet known as Jötunvillur. It is found in some 80 inscriptions, including the one above, which dates from the 11th or 12th century. Recently the news broke that a runologist in Norway was successful. It turns out that you had to replace the rune character with the last letter of the sound it produced. So the rune for “f”, which was pronounced like “fe”, represented an “e”. And so researchers were able to decode the 900-year-old message on the piece of wood above, which turned out to be - wait for it… - “Kiss me”! It gets better, however. It turns out that coding and decoding such messages was a playful game, a leisure activity. This is clear from the fact that some of the inscriptions invite the reader to solve the code, stating for example “Interpret these runes.” This, of course, makes the discovery of the “Kiss me” message even more sensational. The kiss was no doubt the reward for the successful individual who cracked this particular message. Two Viking lovers entertaining themselves with a playful coding game - that came with a delightful climax. Awesome.

More information: this Norwegian article originally reported the story, which is also the source of the image (made by Jonas Nordby, the researcher who cracked the code). I picked up the story from the invaluable Medievalists blog (here).

strandbooks:
Book diagram in The Dictionary of American Slang by Harold Wentworth and Stuart Berg Flexner.

strandbooks:

Book diagram in The Dictionary of American Slang by Harold Wentworth and Stuart Berg Flexner.

Source: flickr.com

Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes and prism, are all very good words for the lips.
Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit
Without knowing the force of words, it is impossible to know human beings.
Confucius
oupacademic:

"Partridge, who expressed surprise that a Currys shop assistant didn’t have ‘a basic grasp of Latin’ and who chastised his friend Michael for ‘hanging around with a man who uses a collective term for a single vehicle’, would no doubt be proud to be a part of the historical record of the English language." Check out the seven entries in the OED which feature quotes from the great man! (via Aha! Alan Partridge in the OED | OxfordWords blog)

oupacademic:

"Partridge, who expressed surprise that a Currys shop assistant didn’t have ‘a basic grasp of Latin’ and who chastised his friend Michael for ‘hanging around with a man who uses a collective term for a single vehicle’, would no doubt be proud to be a part of the historical record of the English language." Check out the seven entries in the OED which feature quotes from the great man! (via Aha! Alan Partridge in the OED | OxfordWords blog)