Among the Gnomes. An occult tale of adventure in the Untersberg, etc
{Insert joke about the British TV show here…}

Among the Gnomes. An occult tale of adventure in the Untersberg, etc

{Insert joke about the British TV show here…}

Source: flickr.com

{I have no idea where this comes from or what it is in reference to. But it’s cool.}

{I have no idea where this comes from or what it is in reference to. But it’s cool.}

vikingpenguinbooks:

Garm howls loud before Looming-cave,
the bond will break, and the ravenous one run;
much lore she knows, I see further ahead,
of the powers’ fate, implacable, of the victory-gods.
 
Brothers will struggle and slaughter each other,
and sisters’ sons spoil kinship’s bonds.
It’s hard on earth: great whoredom;
axe-age, blade-age, shields are split;
wind-age, wolf-age, before the world crumbles:
no one shall spare another.
 
Mím’s sons sport, the wood of destiny is kindled
at the ancient Sounding-horn.
Heimdall blows loud, the horn is aloft,
Odin speaks with Mím’s head.
 
The standing ash of Yggdrasil shudders,
the aged tree groans, and the giant breaks free.
All are afraid on the paths of Hel,
before Surt’s kin swallows it up.
 

—Völuspá stanzas 44-47, from THE ELDER EDDA (Penguin Classics Legends of the Ancient North; on-sale: October 29, 2013) by Anonymous, translated by Andy Orchard

vikingpenguinbooks:

Garm howls loud before Looming-cave,

the bond will break, and the ravenous one run;

much lore she knows, I see further ahead,

of the powers’ fate, implacable, of the victory-gods.

 

Brothers will struggle and slaughter each other,

and sisters’ sons spoil kinship’s bonds.

It’s hard on earth: great whoredom;

axe-age, blade-age, shields are split;

wind-age, wolf-age, before the world crumbles:

no one shall spare another.

 

Mím’s sons sport, the wood of destiny is kindled

at the ancient Sounding-horn.

Heimdall blows loud, the horn is aloft,

Odin speaks with Mím’s head.

 

The standing ash of Yggdrasil shudders,

the aged tree groans, and the giant breaks free.

All are afraid on the paths of Hel,

before Surt’s kin swallows it up.

 

Völuspá stanzas 44-47, from THE ELDER EDDA (Penguin Classics Legends of the Ancient North; on-sale: October 29, 2013) by Anonymous, translated by Andy Orchard

houghtonlib:

Recueil de la diuersité des habits, qui sont de present en vsage, tant es pays d’Europe, Asie, Affrique & isles sauuages, 1564.

Typ 515.64.734

Houghton Library, Harvard University

the-two-germanys:

Cuchulain in Battle.

the-two-germanys:

Cuchulain in Battle.

The Satyr and the Peasant

The Satyr and the Peasant


Hanging in the “Magic and Witchcraft” case in the court of the Pitt Rivers Museum is a strange object from Wellington in Somerset. [Pitt Rivers Museum number: 1911.32.7] It is a one and a half meter long string with a loop at one end through which feathers have been inserted along its length. The label declares it to be a:
"Witches ladder made with cock’s feathers. Said to have been used for getting away the milk from neighbour’s cows and for causing people’s deaths. From an attic in the house of an old woman (a witch?) who died in Wellington."
This information is based on a note sent to the museum with the object in 1911 when it was donated by Anna Tylor, the wife of the famous anthropologist Edward Burnett Tylor. This stated:
"The "witches’ ladder" came from here (Wellington). An old woman, said to be a witch, died, this was found in an attic, & sent to my Husband. It was described as made of "stag’s" (cock’s) feathers, & was thought to be used for getting away the milk from the neighbours’ cows - nothing was said about flying or climbing up. There is a novel called "The Witch Ladder" by E. Tyler in which the ladder is coiled up in the roof to cause some one’s death."

Hanging in the “Magic and Witchcraft” case in the court of the Pitt Rivers Museum is a strange object from Wellington in Somerset. [Pitt Rivers Museum number: 1911.32.7] It is a one and a half meter long string with a loop at one end through which feathers have been inserted along its length. The label declares it to be a:

"Witches ladder made with cock’s feathers. Said to have been used for getting away the milk from neighbour’s cows and for causing people’s deaths. From an attic in the house of an old woman (a witch?) who died in Wellington."

This information is based on a note sent to the museum with the object in 1911 when it was donated by Anna Tylor, the wife of the famous anthropologist Edward Burnett Tylor. This stated:

"The "witches’ ladder" came from here (Wellington). An old woman, said to be a witch, died, this was found in an attic, & sent to my Husband. It was described as made of "stag’s" (cock’s) feathers, & was thought to be used for getting away the milk from the neighbours’ cows - nothing was said about flying or climbing up. There is a novel called "The Witch Ladder" by E. Tyler in which the ladder is coiled up in the roof to cause some one’s death."

ffactory:

Elf Cross amulet from Skåne (18th-19th c.): These crosses, hung around the neck, were used in southern Sweden and in Denmark to prevent and cure disease.
To offer protection, the elf cross had to be manufactured and handed over to the owner in accordance with special ceremonies. The silver had to be collected by begging in the neighbourhood according to special rules which depended on the gender of the intended wearer, and the smith was not allowed to be paid for his work. The cross, which was worn next to the skin, under clothes and invisible to others, was marked with Christian symbols in the form of a sun cross, a Christ monogram, a prayer for help and the wearer’s initials. It was given to newborn babies, confirmands and adults who were already ill or in need of special protection. An elf cross could not be sold but was taken by the wearer to their grave.
[Nordiska Museet]

ffactory:

Elf Cross amulet from Skåne (18th-19th c.): These crosses, hung around the neck, were used in southern Sweden and in Denmark to prevent and cure disease.

To offer protection, the elf cross had to be manufactured and handed over to the owner in accordance with special ceremonies. The silver had to be collected by begging in the neighbourhood according to special rules which depended on the gender of the intended wearer, and the smith was not allowed to be paid for his work. The cross, which was worn next to the skin, under clothes and invisible to others, was marked with Christian symbols in the form of a sun cross, a Christ monogram, a prayer for help and the wearer’s initials. It was given to newborn babies, confirmands and adults who were already ill or in need of special protection. An elf cross could not be sold but was taken by the wearer to their grave.

[Nordiska Museet]