Source: dawnritual

Reynard the Fox, dressed like a Bishop(?), attacks a rabbit.

Reynard the Fox, dressed like a Bishop(?), attacks a rabbit.

Among the Gnomes. An occult tale of adventure in the Untersberg, etc
{Insert joke about the British TV show here…}

Among the Gnomes. An occult tale of adventure in the Untersberg, etc

{Insert joke about the British TV show here…}

Source: flickr.com

{I have no idea where this comes from or what it is in reference to. But it’s cool.}

{I have no idea where this comes from or what it is in reference to. But it’s cool.}

vikingpenguinbooks:

Garm howls loud before Looming-cave,
the bond will break, and the ravenous one run;
much lore she knows, I see further ahead,
of the powers’ fate, implacable, of the victory-gods.
 
Brothers will struggle and slaughter each other,
and sisters’ sons spoil kinship’s bonds.
It’s hard on earth: great whoredom;
axe-age, blade-age, shields are split;
wind-age, wolf-age, before the world crumbles:
no one shall spare another.
 
Mím’s sons sport, the wood of destiny is kindled
at the ancient Sounding-horn.
Heimdall blows loud, the horn is aloft,
Odin speaks with Mím’s head.
 
The standing ash of Yggdrasil shudders,
the aged tree groans, and the giant breaks free.
All are afraid on the paths of Hel,
before Surt’s kin swallows it up.
 

—Völuspá stanzas 44-47, from THE ELDER EDDA (Penguin Classics Legends of the Ancient North; on-sale: October 29, 2013) by Anonymous, translated by Andy Orchard

vikingpenguinbooks:

Garm howls loud before Looming-cave,

the bond will break, and the ravenous one run;

much lore she knows, I see further ahead,

of the powers’ fate, implacable, of the victory-gods.

 

Brothers will struggle and slaughter each other,

and sisters’ sons spoil kinship’s bonds.

It’s hard on earth: great whoredom;

axe-age, blade-age, shields are split;

wind-age, wolf-age, before the world crumbles:

no one shall spare another.

 

Mím’s sons sport, the wood of destiny is kindled

at the ancient Sounding-horn.

Heimdall blows loud, the horn is aloft,

Odin speaks with Mím’s head.

 

The standing ash of Yggdrasil shudders,

the aged tree groans, and the giant breaks free.

All are afraid on the paths of Hel,

before Surt’s kin swallows it up.

 

Völuspá stanzas 44-47, from THE ELDER EDDA (Penguin Classics Legends of the Ancient North; on-sale: October 29, 2013) by Anonymous, translated by Andy Orchard